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SEPHORA COLLECTION Beauty Amplifier Smoothing Translucent Setting Powder

SEPHORA COLLECTION
Beauty Amplifier Smoothing Translucent Setting Powder

This ultra-fine colorless powder instantly blends into the skin to mattify, smooth the complexion’s appearance, and set makeup. It reduces the appearance of pores and fine lines and stays put for a lasting effect.
Uploaded by: suz5ive on 24/08/2019

Highlights

SEPHORA COLLECTION Beauty Amplifier Smoothing Translucent Setting Powder
Ingredients explained

A white powdery thing that's the major component of glass and sand. In cosmetics, it’s often in products that are supposed to keep your skin matte as it has great oil-absorbing abilities. It’s also used as a helper ingredient to thicken up products or suspend insoluble particles. 

What-it-does: preservative

It’s pretty much the current IT-preservative. It’s safe and gentle, but even more importantly, it’s not a feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason paraben.

It’s not something new: it was introduced around 1950 and today it can be used up to 1% worldwide. It can be found in nature - in green tea - but the version used in cosmetics is synthetic. 

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Other than having a good safety profile and being quite gentle to the skin it has some other advantages too. It can be used in many types of formulations as it has great thermal stability (can be heated up to 85°C) and works on a wide range of pH levels (ph 3-10). 

It’s often used together with ethylhexylglycerin as it nicely improves the preservative activity of phenoxyethanol.

What-it-does: preservative

A mild, natural preservative that usually comes to the formula together with its other mild preservative friends, such as Benzoic Acid and/or Dehydroacetic Acid. Btw, it's also used as a food preservative.

Also-called: CI 77019

A super versatile and common mineral powder that comes in different particle sizes. It is a multi-tasker used to improve skin feel, increase product slip, give the product light-reflecting properties, enhance skin adhesion or serve as an anti-caking agent.

It is also the most commonly used "base" material for layered composite pigments such as pearl-effect pigments. In this case, mica is coated with one or more metal oxides (most commonly titanium dioxide) to achieve pearl effect via the physical phenomenon known as interference. 

Glycerin - superstar
Also-called: Glycerol | What-it-does: skin-identical ingredient, moisturizer/humectant | Irritancy: 0 | Comedogenicity: 0
  • A natural moisturizer that’s also in our skin
  • A super common, safe, effective and cheap molecule used for more than 50 years
  • Not only a simple moisturizer but knows much more: keeps the skin lipids between our skin cells in a healthy (liquid crystal) state, protects against irritation, helps to restore barrier
  • Effective from as low as 3% with even more benefits at higher concentrations up to 20-40% (around 10% is a good usability-effectiveness sweet spot)
  • High-glycerin moisturizers are awesome for treating severely dry skin
Read all the geeky details about Glycerin here >>

Also-called: Aqua | What-it-does: solvent

Good old water, aka H2O. The most common skincare ingredient of all. You can usually find it right in the very first spot of the ingredient list, meaning it’s the biggest thing out of all the stuff that makes up the product. 

It’s mainly a solvent for ingredients that do not like to dissolve in oils but rather in water. 

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Once inside the skin, it hydrates, but not from the outside - putting pure water on the skin (hello long baths!) is drying. 

One more thing: the water used in cosmetics is purified and deionized (it means that almost all of the mineral ions inside it is removed). Like this, the products can stay more stable over time. 

Also-called: ChroNOline | What-it-does: cell-communicating ingredient

A four amino acid, biomimetic (i.e. a molecule in nature is copied synthetically in a lab) peptide that copies a growth factor that boosts the production of key components of the dermal-epidermal junction (the place where the top two layers of the skin meet). These key components are important skin-structure giving proteins such as collagen VII, laminin-5, and fibronectin.

What this means in practice, and according to the in-vivo (made on people) tests of the manufacturer, is that Caprooyl Tetrapeptide-3 might be able to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. The clinical study had 27 volunteers who used a 2.5%  ChroNOline (the diluted and trade named version of our peptide molecule) cream twice a day and the researchers measured a 16% percent reduction in fine lines and wrinkles after 28 days. In mature volunteers (aged 50-65 ), the improvement continued to a reduction of 27% after 56 days. 

What-it-does: viscosity controlling

We don't have description for this ingredient yet.

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what‑it‑does viscosity controlling
A white powdery thing that can mattify the skin and thicken up cosmetic products. [more]
what‑it‑does preservative
Pretty much the current IT-preservative. It’s safe and gentle, and can be used up to 1% worldwide. [more]
what‑it‑does preservative
A mild, natural preservative that usually comes to the formula together with its other mild preservative friends, such as Benzoic Acid and/or Dehydroacetic Acid. [more]
A mineral powder used to improve skin feel, increase product slip, give the product some light-reflecting properties, enhance skin adhesion or serve as an anti-caking agent. A real multi-tasker. [more]
what‑it‑does skin-identical ingredient | moisturizer/humectant
irritancy, com. 0, 0
A real oldie but a goodie. Great natural moisturizer and skin-identical ingredient that plays an important role in skin hydration and general skin health. [more]
what‑it‑does solvent
Normal (well kind of - it's purified and deionized) water. Usually the main solvent in cosmetic products. [more]
what‑it‑does cell-communicating ingredient
A four amino acid, biomimetic (i.e. a molecule in nature is copied synthetically in a lab) peptide that copies a growth factor that boosts the production of key components of the dermal-epidermal junction (the place where the top two layers of the skin meet). [more]
what‑it‑does viscosity controlling